Because you can't judge a book by its cover

Four

In A Pointed Death by Kath Russell, Nola Billingsley is trying to recover after her dot com business. She starts back to work in the biotechnical industry. One day as she takes her shorthaired pointer, Skooch, for a walk, she comes across the dead body of her former employee, Roger Chen. Unfortunately, the last time she saw Roger was the day she fired him for embezzling funds from her company. Nola starts finding clues that lead her from her dot com business into her biotechnical business that involves Roger Chen. As she pursues her leads, she gets some help from Detective Robert Harrison, the man assigned to her embezzling case.

Can she fall in love and try to solve a case at the same time? Is she going to mess things up with Detective Harrison by trying to find out what Roger Chen was up to when he was killed. And why is there a connection between Roger Chen and the biotechnical industry?

This was a very good book. I really enjoyed Kath Russell’s writing! Kath did a great job of connecting the reader to the characters. I was glad she took the time to explain some of the biotechnical industry and what it does exactly. There is a bit of swearing and the use of the F* word and quite of a bit of sex. I would have to rate the book a 4, and I would recommend it, as long as you don’t mind the swearing and the sex. I would have to rate the book 5 stars for sex, because it is quite graphic. I hope you get the chance to enjoy A Pointed Death, by Kath Russell.

Rating: 

Content: 

Title: A Pointed Death

Author: Kath Russell

Format: Paperback, eBook

Page Nos.: 352

ISBN: 978-1450563093

Publisher: Createspace

Release Date: August 2010

Available for purchase: Amazon

Reviewer: Jocee

 

**I received a copy of this book from the author but was not required to provide a review and it did not impact my review in any way.

 

What if Mr. Rochester from the classic Jane Eyre were a rockstar? Jane by April Lindner is a modern retelling of the classic Jane Eyre novel. Jane, after an isolated childhood, is forced to seek employment as a nanny after the death of her parents forces her to drop out of college.  Jane arrives at Thornfield Manor with only a general idea of who Nico is and the music he has produced.  All Jane knows is she is to take care of Nico’s child Maddy.  When Nico arrives home to prepare for his comeback tour, Jane finds herself fascinated with the complex man.

Nico is a man who is used to people fawning over him and agreeing to everything he says. He is intrigued when Jane, a woman completely different from the selfish glamorous women he is usually surrounded by, doesn’t agree with him all the time. Nico finds himself drawn to Jane even when the beautiful Biana shows up to photograph his practice sessions with his band.

I was very intrigued from the beginning with the premise of this book, while numerous retellings exist for Jane Austen’s books, this was the first one I saw for Jane Eyre, one of my favorite books of all time.  April Lindner does an amazing job in keeping the gothic overtones of the original classic  without delving into the paranormal genre.

I was disappointed that Lindner added a sex scene to the classic, I realize this is modern trend but I just didn’t feel it was necessary to the story. Also, there was quite a few “f” words uttered by Nico, which is believable of a rockstar with a ‘bad boy’ past but just be aware.

Lindner’s incorporation of the St. Rivers family was impressive.  In a time of accessible hotels and services for the homeless, Lindner was able to believably make Jane desperate for a place to stay, introducing the St. Rivers siblings.

Part of the reason I love the original classic is the complex main characters.  Lindner’s Nico is able to capture the essence of the original Mr. Rochester perfectly, his ego, vulnerabilities, loneliness while being surrounded by people and his unselfishness/selfishness. Basically, I want to slap him at the same time I want to hug him and promise to love him forever. Jane’s character I had little more trouble with, the original Jane is a very passionate woman under her plain exterior who is partly so restrained because of the role society had placed upon her and given her need to work. Lindner’s Jane just didn’t feel as passionate for me, Lindner did a good job with Jane’s background as to why she felt lonely growing up but I failed to feel the extreme passioniate nature boiling under Jane’s skin. I like Jane, don’t get me wrong, but I just didn’t feel the passionate nature bursting at the edges of her plain exterior. That being said, I would highly recommend Jane by April Lindner to anyone who is a fan of the original Jane Eyre or anyone who struggled to get through the original archiac writing style and language would enjoy the fresh take on this classic.

Rating:

Title: Jane

Author: April Lindner

Format: Hardbound, eBook

Page Nos.: 384

ISBN: 978-0316084208

Publisher: Poppy

Release Date: October 11, 2010

Available for purchase: Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble

Reviewer: Jessica

**I received a copy of this book from the publisher but was not required to provide a review and it did not impact my review in any way.

Lillie St. Claire is just starting to recover from the mess her husband’s death has left her life in, not that it was any better when he was alive, when his zombified body appears in her bathroom as she is about to slip into a bath. Dark & Disorderly by Bernita Harris is about Lillie St. Claire, a Talent who can permanently dispatch  the spirits of the dead and is in great demand as the spirits on earth are getting more restless. With the appearance of her husband’s zombified body, Lillie finds herself a suspect in his murder and finds herself having to deal with psi-crime detective John Thresher. Lillie can’t understand why anyone would think she would want to reanimate her husband when he thought she was a Freak and made her life a nightmare.

As if things weren’t bad enough, Lillie finds herself the target of a series of accidents and Thresher decides to stick close to her side as things get more deadly. Lillie finds herself attracted Thresher but is hesitant to let anyone close physically or emotionally after the abuse she suffered from her husband.

Lillie’s talent isn’t an easy one, most of the time she is called upon to get rid of ghosts who like to relive their horrific death or crimes they committed, like getting rid of pedophile ghosts who linger around children’s playgrounds making children uncomfortable. Most members of society are both nervous of Lillie’s talent and super demanding of her powers to get rid of the apparitions.  I really enjoyed this novel. Lillie was a sympathetic character with all that she has gone through without being weak, always a fine line for an author to tread.  In many of the urban fantasy novels I have read, the main character has flaws and problems that come about because of selfish choices, I didn’t feel like that was the case here, Lillie pushed herself to the edge of her powers both physically and emotionally because she feels strongly that the ghosts lingering behind to terrorize the living need to be dispatched as soon as possible.  One of my favorite characters is Lillie’s ghost dog Dumbarton, not only does he scare away intruders, he also spends time chasing the ghost squirrels that reside in the cemetery next door. Thresher’s history is left wide open and I eagerly look forward to the next book in the series. Dark and Disorderly was a great mix of mystery, paranormal and mythology and I recommend it.

Rating:

Title: Dark & Disorderly

Author: Bernita Harris

Format: ebook

ISBN: 9781426890338

Publisher: Carina Press

Release Date: June 2010

Available for purchase: Carina Press, Amazon.com

Reviewer: Jessica

**I received a copy of this book from Net Galley but was not required to provide a review and it did not impact my review in any way.

Tara Sheridan has a gift, she is able to use Tarot cards and traditional investigative techniques to solve crimes, however, Tara has sworn off using her gift since her near death at the hands of a serial killer she was tracking down. Dark Oracle by Alayna Williams begins with Tara sequestered in the mountains, ignoring her gift but when the scientist Magnusson goes missing under mysterious circumstances Tara is convinced to come out of hiding for this one case.

Tara finds herself working closely with FBI agent Harry Li to figure out what happened to Magnusson and in the process of the investigation, she finds herself protecting Magnusson’s daughter Cassie and his lab. As events escalate, Cassie and Harry are forced to start investigation the very agency they work for and Cassie finds herself facing the very things she ran away from originally, relying more and more on Harry for support.

I started reading this book with some trepidation, I have always associated the use of Tarot cards with the use of dark or evil powers. Williams’ use of the cards to assist in the investigation was well done and has changed my opinion regarding the use of tarot cards. The novel was an intriguing read as the story followed both the mystery of the missing scientist and the path of Tara as she came to terms with what happened to her. I found the main character sympathetic without being weak, always a difficult balance to be achieved by an author.

Rating:

Title: Dark Oracle

Author: Alayna Williams

Format: Paperback,  eBook

Page Nos.: 336

ISBN: 978-1439182796

Publisher: Pocket

Release Date: May 2010

Available for purchase: Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble.com

Reviewer: Jessica

**I received a copy of this book from the author but was not required to provide a review and it did not impact my review in any way.

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Why Ratings?
It is true you can't judge a book by its cover, you also can't judge a book's graphic content by its cover. NovelReaction's goal is to provide readers with a graphic content so they can make an informed decision regarding the books they want to read. (Also, to have a great place for people to discuss books.) So sit back, pull up a beverage, and read on!
Ratings*

1 = kissing
2 = kissing, some fondling
3 = descriptive stripping but no sex
4 = sex scene but not descriptive in details
5 = full descriptive sex scene

*I am rating a specific book by an author, not the author's style. If I am aware an author writes a specific way, I will let you know.

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