For love of reading, or don’t drop the book in the food…

Hello all! I have decided to try and help Jessica out and write a couple of articles myself. Hopefully they turn out as great as her articles!

Have you ever had a book that was so good, you just couldn’t put it down? I often find myself needing to get dinner on the table, but have the dilemma of wanting to continue reading and my “mommy duties” calling me. I have started to bring my book/kindle with me into the kitchen with me. I will read while I wait for water to boil, or for a oven to preheat. However, I also find myself over cooking things and making them “Cajun” style as my Dad used to tell us when he’d burn the food. But I do love to read and try to get myself to pay better attention to my “mommy duties” and still enjoy my book. Do you read while cooking too?

Wednesday Words: Cicero

Having spent the last two days moving my 4,000 print copies of books this quote has been on my mind, I smile during the move because I see so many old friends I want to reread, all of our real friends who showed up to help us move didn’t smile while moving them.

“A room without books is like a body without a soul.”

-Marcus Tillius Cicero

Comfort Reading

I written before about stress reading, having talked with other voracious readers (and my siblings) I know that I am not alone in my stress reading. By stress reading I mean that as life gets more stressful the amount of reading I do is more (usually in direct proportion to the amount of stress going up).  You can read more about my thoughts on stress reading here. Lately, as my life has gotten more stressful I have realized that not only does my reading amount rise, I find myself returning to what I consider “comfort reads.” Comfort reads are those reads that I return to again and again, it doesn’t matter how many times I read them I am always happy to return to there world and greet them as long lost friends.

I started to think about why this is so. I love finding new authors, there is nothing quite like the excitement of holding a new book in your hands, the potential that you will find a setting you love, characters you connect with and a story you will want to return to again and again. Granted there is always the potential that the story won’t connect with you on some level, you will find the heroine whiny, the hero too arrogant, the story line lacking in some way. But that is the great thing about new novels, the excitement of the unknown.  I currently have books in my to-be-read pile that I have been eagerly waiting for, new authors that looked interesting and books that are continuing series that I know I like. And yet they all sit untouched…

I think that as everything else gets crazy and different, hectic and unknown, I want to return to worlds I know. I find myself wanting to spend time with characters I know I like, where I can laugh and cry with old friends. So lately I have been revisiting old favorites. I have been spending quality time with Georgette Heyer, Julia Quinn, Jayne Castle, Lynn Kurland and Roberta Owen.

Do you feel this way? Do you find yourself returning to old favorites? If you do, who do you return to? Who is your comfort read?

Darkness Becomes Her By Jaime Rush Review

Lachlan McLeod has spent the last year punishing himself for a mistake that he made with the strange powers he inherited. Darkness Becomes Her by Jaime Rush is the sixth book (I know the reading order says it is number 9 but two of the books are a half story in the series reading list) in the Offspring series. Lachlan’s self-imposed punishment includes living a monk-like existence and denying himself the desire for everything from food, to comfort, to the touch of a woman. When the powers that Lachlan thought he had lost returns, Lachlan sees the future and the death of his brother Magnus, determined to prevent this from happening Lachlan searches out the apparent murder in his vision, Jessie Bellandre.

Jessie Bellandre has been living a life on the run since the release of her uncle from prison after he was convicted of murdering her mother. Jessie fears the Darkness that resides in herself, this same Darkness that in her uncle caused him to murder Jessie’s mother and father. But when Magnus is fatally wounded Jessie must use the Darkness to heal him, fearing that he won’t be able to handle the Darkness she agrees to train and stay with Lachlan until Magnus recovers. In return Lachlan agrees to track down Jessie’s murderous uncle, protecting her in the process. But as Lachlan and Jessie get closer, will they be able to keep themselves isolated from their emotions and each other?

Darkness Becomes Her is the first book in the series that I have read and as is usually the case, there was some confusion I felt with some of the story line, especially a series as well developed as Offspring (this is what I get for reading a book without looking to see if it is part of a series first). With a series this complex and character rich it can get difficult to keep everyone and their abilities straight, lucky for us Jaime has created a who’s who page here. I experienced some confusion about who the Offspring were and what there purpose was (besides having superhero powers) but the characters expierenced confusion over what the Darkness was and how to control it so it felt like I was progressing along in knowledge as the characters did. I gave Darkness Becomes Her a three star rating because I didn’t love the story but I didn’t hate it either, it was interesting read and Rush’s exploration of what love really is and how it is by our actions that we truly show whether we love an individual or not was well done.

You can read an excerpt here.

Offspring Reading Order:

A Perfect Darkness

Out of the Darkness

Bitten By Cupid

Touching Darkness

Burning Darkness

Beyond the Darkness

The Darkness Within

Darkness Becomes Her

Rating: 

Content: 

Title: Darkness Becomes Her

Author: Jaime Rush

Format: Paperback, eBook

Page Nos.: 384

ISBN: 978-0062018922

Publisher: Avon

Release Date: May 29, 2012

Available for purchase: Amazon

Reviewer: Jessica

 

**I received a copy of this book from the publisher but was not required to provide a review and it did not impact my review in any way.