Because you can't judge a book by its cover

Monthly Archives: February 2011

This month we are doing an interesting book-to-movie, we are going to read Red Riding Hood by Sarah Blakley-Cartwright which is a novel based on a movie that is based on a fairy tale. I thought an interesting way to approach this would be for use to read the original fairy tale, then read the book and then watch the movie. I have to admit the visual imagery of the movie that I have seen in the previews has me very interested and intrigued to see if the plot line lives up to the images.

The tale of Red Riding Hood originally started as an oral tale told in several different countries, the earliest record being told in the 14th Century by Italian peasants. The earliest written version is Le Petit Chaperon Rouge by Charles Perrault in 1697, who is credited with adding the red riding hood to the story. You can read Perrault’s version for free from Project Guttenberg here or you can get a free version for your Kindle. I studied a written version in my Children’s Literature class in my undergrad degree and the version we read was a very dirty tale, not the moralized version that Perrault wrote down. You can read a whole history of the fairy tale at Wikipedia. (Image a woodcut by Gustave Dore 1883)

The novel version we are reading is Red Riding Hood by Sarah Blakley-Cartwright published by Poppy, a division of Hachette, available January 2011. An interesting thing the publisher is doing is the last chapter of the book is not available until March 2011 in connection with the release of the movie.  You can read an excerpt here. The publisher has released in enhanced ebook copy that includes video footage of the director, author and screen writer discussing their creative partnership. There are also sketches of the sets and costumes and audio discussing many different aspects of the film creation.

I haven’t read the book yet but some things to keep in mind when reading and watching:

-How close to the original fairytale does the book and the movie stay?

-What does the red cape represent?

-What do you think about reading a book based on a screenplay based on a fairy tale?

-Do you think it works? Do you think  it is just a shameful attempt to get more money from movie goers?

So pull up a book, a bucket of popcorn, and let the fun begin!

“I’m late, I’m late for a very important date…” I didn’t get a chance to watch the The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe this weekend and prepare my report this weekend because I have mid-terms this week and it through off everything. Because of this I am going to post the Books-to-Movie Intro today (which I prepared a couple of weeks ago) for Red Riding Hood and later this week I will post the the report. Sorry for the delay!

“I am Johannes Verne and I am not afraid.” For Johannes, in The Lonesome Gods by Louis L’Amour, life has started off differently than other kids. He grew up never knowing kids his own age and only participating in conversations with adults, mostly with his mother and father. By the time he was eight, Johannes was already thinking and conversing on the level of adults. Because his mother had passed away and his father was dying, they joined an emergency wagon train west, hoping to arrive in California in time for Johannes to meet his grandfather. Unfortunately, his grandfather still carried hard feelings towards his father. Johannes and his father stopped in the desert outside of California and started a life where the dry air could help his father live a little longer than the moist eastern air. Johannes and his father were soon tracked by the grandfather and by some miracle Johannes survived in the vast desert. He was protected by his new found Indian friends and by the people who rode west with him. Johannes joins Miss Nesselrode and she taught him many things about business. He continued to learn and soon fell in love with a girl named Meghan. Life continued to be extremely difficult and Johannes realized he had made many enemies by just existing. Will Johannes ever be truly free to do as he chooses or will he forever need to be watching his back from those that wish him harm?

I really loved this book by Louis L’Amour. It had tons of action to keep me interested along with the subtle love story within the plot. This novel in particular made me stop and think a lot about different aspects of the wilderness and how things and people have gone on before. I loved the main character Johannes and really enjoyed how the author managed to develop such a strong character through out the course of the novel. Johannes was full of integrity, intelligence, and initiative. He didn’t sit back and wait for things to happen- he met them head on, knowing what had to be done. I also loved the descriptions of the desert: Louis L’Amour managed to transform something generally thought of as ugly into a thing of true beauty and wonder. The novel really had an amazing plot and some very good morals.

Rating:

Content:

Title: The Lonesome Gods

Author: Louis L’Amour

Format: Paperback, ebook, audio

Page Nos.: 560

ISBN: 978-0553275186

Publisher: Bantam

Release Date: 1983

Reviewer: Jillian

In Delirium, by Lauren Oliver love is forbidden.  Not only is it forbidden but if you show any signs of love you could be put to death.  Lena Holway is terrified of catching the disease.  It has been known to run in families and Lena’s own mother was driven mad and committed suicide because of it.  Counting down the days until she can be cured for good, Lena meets Alex, who makes her heart skip a beat.  Finding out the truth about Love and who Alex is, is only the beginning of Lena’s discoveries.

Delirium is a book that had me from the first chapter.  The dystopian theme has been a favorite of mine and this does not disappoint!  Lena is a great heroine who continues to grow throughout the novel.  She is a law abiding citizen and yet in her mind she has thoughts that even scare herself.  She feels so suffocated by her past that she can’t wait for her future of meloncholy until she meets Alex.  Alex is a loveable character who has just the right amount of romance, heroism, and rebellion.

The only lacking in the book is the government.  I’m hoping the next book in the series touches more on why the world outlawed love.  There is some reasoning that is told creativley through quotes from books from Lena’s school and yet I never felt the connection.

I would recommend this book to anyone.  Exciting story line, great characters, and a little romance!

 

You can read an excerpt here.

 

Rating: 

Content: 

Title: Delirium

Author: Lauren Oliver

Format: eBook, Hardcover

Page #’s: 305

ISBN: 978-0-06-172682-8

Publisher: Harper Collins

Release Date: February 2011

Reviewer: Megan

**I received a copy of this book from NetGalley but was not required to provide a review and it did not impact my review in any way.

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Why Ratings?
It is true you can't judge a book by its cover, you also can't judge a book's graphic content by its cover. NovelReaction's goal is to provide readers with a graphic content so they can make an informed decision regarding the books they want to read. (Also, to have a great place for people to discuss books.) So sit back, pull up a beverage, and read on!
Graphic Ratings*

1 = kissing
2 = kissing, some fondling
3 = descriptive stripping but no sex
4 = sex scene but not descriptive in details
5 = full descriptive sex scene

*I am rating a specific book by an author, not the author's style. If I am aware an author writes a specific way, I will let you know.

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